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So, @Lazy Admin my SD Card failed, and I had to reinstall Raspbian. The known hosts keys have thus changed.

maidens-point (a Doctor Who AND Cthulhu mythos reference, I rock) is mapped in hosts to 192.168.1.128 - the static IP of the Pi.

When I first ssh'd in, I got the warning about the change in known_hosts. I went "oh yeah", and cleared it out. SSH has been fine since. I login with a username and password, not with keys. With SSH it's fine.

However, with FISH, if I connect to maidens-point I still get the warning that known_hosts has changed, and that the keys are invalid. It allows me to connect, but displays a warning every single time. FISH also logs in with a username and password, and as the same user.

If I connect to 192.168.1.128, it's fine - but I never, not even a single time, logged in with an IP address before reinstalling Raspbian, so that probably explains it.

Why does it give me the warning? Where is FISH getting the well known from? I assume this is a KDE thing. That's the only explanation I can think of - KDE must have it's own SSH stuff, similar to the cookie store...but where is it? What is it reading from if not ~/.ssh?

Stackoverflow doesn't seem to know.

Thomas Willingham 2 weeks ago
FISH is a protocol, it won't have a man page. Though it's also a kpart, which does - but contains nothing useful.

It's the wrong system for the fish men though...all my machines are named after something in the Cthulhu mythos, but Innsmouth, where the fishmen live, is a laptop.

Thomas Willingham 5 days ago
Anyway, turns out I'm a massive cockwomble.

The issue is, of course, I'm a different user in FISH to SSH.



 
I find it odd that people here all use Github. I mean, I use github too, but my main repo is on my Raspberry Pi, and I did self host my repos until it got to the stage where I couldn't afford a decent VPS. Most of you have way more room for it than I do, but still, nobody self hosts.

Maybe you think it's hard, so here's a how-to showing that it isn't.

Host your own remote Git repositories  |  Kenn Wilson

You’d never know it sometimes, but not all developers want to use GitHub.
@Lazy Admin
Tobias 2 months ago from Friendly
A simpler way might be to use some suite managing it all. I settled down with Kallithea, as it supports git and mercirial.

I'll look into that setup might save some resources.



 
In RetroPie, I have two joypads, a DragonRise Analogue pad, which works fine, and a Level3 Digital Pad which works fine - except in the EmulationStation menu. In the emulation station menu, every time you move the pad, it behaves as if you've pressed the button two or four times. Always exactly two, or exactly four. Not a range. It is impossible to move one item at a time in the menu list. The only way to select items is to ensure there's an odd number of items in the list, so you can "jump" between scrolling odds and evens at the start and end of a page. Switching left and right work the same.

I've tried in the pad a different machine, also running emulation station, and it's fine there. It's specific to either RetroPie, or the Raspberry Pi.

I don't even know where to look. Any hint? Device information in the spoilers.

@Lazy Admin


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Also, heads up...

oss-security - Re: OpenSSH: CVE-2015-6565 (pty issue in 6.8-6.9) can lead to local privesc on Linux

Powered by blists - more mailing lists Please check out the Open Source Software Security Wiki, which is counterpart to this mailing list. Powered by Openwall GNU/*/Linux - Powered by OpenVZ...
@Lazy Admin


 
Long time members of this forum - of which there are none - will be aware how much of a fan I am of Fish, but also how annoying it is that all bash scripts are written for, well, bash, so you get confused switching between the two.

So here's a cheat sheet.
Hypolite Petovan 2 months ago
I didn't know about Fish, thanks for the discovery. I don't think I'll use it because my usage of shell is sparse, but I'm always glad to learn something new.

Thomas Willingham 2 months ago
Fish has a vastly superior autocomplete to bash - that makes it especially useful if you don't know your way around the command line because you don't use it much, or you're using a strange system, or whatever. Against ZSH, it doesn't offer much - except you don't have to configure anything. If you do want to configure anything, you can use the text files - or you can use a graphical interface in your web browser, which isn't as stupid as it sounds.

I found it particularly useful when I was switching between Debian proper and Ubuntu. The apt autocomplete made finding Ubuntu's quirky package names so much easier. Didn't have to search for every renamed package, just let tab figure it out.

Syntax highlighting is built in, wildcards work much less arcanely than bash, and error messages make more sense.

The only disadvantage is that 99% of scripts are written for bash, so you either need to translate them, or execute them with sh filename instead of ./filename